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Showing posts with label IPHONE 6. Show all posts
Showing posts with label IPHONE 6. Show all posts

Saturday, 15 August 2015

Samsung Galaxy Note 5 vs iPhone 6 Plus comparison: huge competition

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The new Samsung Galaxy Note 5 is pretty nifty, but it’s going up against Apple’s biggest and best iPhone, the iPhone 6 Plus, and a successor to that could be unveiled as soon as next month. How does the Note 5 fare against Apple’s current big beast? Let’s find out in our Galaxy Note 5 vs iPhone 6 Plus comparison.
samsung galaxy note 5 iphone 6 plus volume buttons

Galaxy Note 5 vs iPhone 6 Plus: design and build quality

Let’s face it. The new Note really looks like the iPhone 6 Plus, albeit without the attention to detail that Apple lavishes on its hardware. The Note 5 measures in at 153.2 x 76.1 x 7.6 mm and weighs 171 g. 
The 172 g Plus is Apple’s biggest phone, at 158.1 mm tall and 77.8 mm wide, but it may be a little too thin - early reports suggested it was a little bendy, something that’s been addressed with the imminent 6S, but it’s still a work of engineering art. Nobody makes phones quite like Apple does. 
samsung galaxy note 5 iphone 6 plus back

Galaxy Note 5 vs iPhone 6 Plus: display

The Galaxy Note 5 has a 5.7-inch QHD Super AMOLED display delivering 2,560 x 1,440 pixels at 518 ppi, and it’s absolutely superb: pin sharp with excellent color reproduction and good viewing angles. As with any AMOLED the display can be a little bright for some tastes, but that’s easy to adjust in each device’s Settings panel. The display is protected with the latest generation of Gorilla Glass, which comes with claims of 80 percent better durability than the glass on some lesser smartphones.
samsung galaxy note 5 iphone 6 plus screen
The QHD Note 5 has a far higher pixel count than the iPhone 6 Plus. / © ANDROIDPIT
Apple’s screen is smaller and less dense: it’s a 5.5-inch backlit IPS LCD with 1,920 x 1,080 pixels at 401 ppi. The viewing angles are superb and color reproduction is excellent, but the Note has the more impressive display.

Galaxy Note 5 vs iPhone 6 Plus: processor and storage

The Note 5 comes packing an eight-core Exynos 7420 processor with 4 GB of RAM, and it’s backed up with either 32 GB or 64 GB of internal storage, but no microSD card slot. Samsung hasn’t announced clock speeds yet but the same processor in the Galaxy S6 is clocked with four cores at 2.1 GHz and four at 1.5 GHz.
The iPhone has Apple’s A8 processor, which is a dual-core 1.4 GHz ARM-based system of Apple’s own making. On paper it’s rubbish compared to the octa-core Exynos, but Apple’s total control of hardware and OS means it can optimize its devices really well. The Note is by far the faster device, but iOS is smoother than even Lollipop, which is likely to cancel out the spec advantage here. There’s just 1 GB of on-board RAM and the choice of non-upgradeable storage is 16, 64 or 128 GB.
samsung galaxy note 5 iphone 6 plus side power button
Neither the Galaxy Note 5, nor the iPhone 6 Plus, have a removable battery or microSD card support. / © ANDROIDPIT

Galaxy Note 5 vs iPhone 6 Plus: camera

The Note 5 has a 5 MP front-facing selfie snapper and a 16 MP rear camera with optical image stabilisation. It’s the same as the current Galaxy S6 camera and sensor, which we've previously found to be really good.
It’s another on-paper defeat for Apple here: its main camera may have optical stabilization and a dual LED flash, but it’s just 8 MP. However, it’s backed by one of the best sensors in the business, so don’t let that number make you think iPhone 6 Plus photos aren’t good. They are, and rumors suggest the next model will be getting Sony’s latest sensor and a mystery next-gen camera system. How exciting.
samsung galaxy note 5 iphone 6 plus camera
In terms of raw pixel count, the Note 5 has the higher resolution camera. / © ANDROIDPIT

Galaxy Note 5 vs iPhone 6 Plus: software

The Note 5 runs Android 5.1.1 Lollipop with Samsung’s recently slimmed down TouchWiz, and will get Android M when the operating system is finished.
iPhones, of course, run iOS. The current version is iOS 8 and the Plus will get iOS 9 when it’s launched in the fall. You either like iOS or you don’t; but the similarities between iOS and Android grow with each release.
samsung galaxy note 5 iphone 6 plus top
Both handsets are slim and smooth. / © ANDROIDPIT

Galaxy Note 5 vs iPhone 6 Plus: battery

The Galaxy Note 5 comes with a 3,000 mAh battery, which is significantly larger than the 2,550 mAh unit you’ll find inside the Galaxy S6. It also gets the same power saving and power management features we saw in the S6, so hopefully that means all-day battery life – something the Galaxy S6 doesn’t always manage. The Note 5 also supports fast charging, which tops the battery up by around a third in 15 minutes. Full charging takes two hours using wireless charging or 90 minutes with a cabled charger.
Apple doesn’t offer wireless charging or fast charging, and its 2,915 mAh battery is slightly smaller than the Note 5’s. However, Apple did a good job with battery optimization in iOS 8 and the iPhone’s difficulties in going all day are largely gone.
samsung galaxy note 5 iphone 6 plus USB
The Galaxy Note 5 lacks a reversible USB Type-C connector, sadly. / © ANDROIDPIT

Galaxy Note 5 vs iPhone 6 Plus: early verdict

The Note 5 is a superb phone, and on paper at least it deals blow after blow to Apple’s biggest iPhone: it’s got a bigger, better screen, much faster processing, more RAM and more megapixels. Apple’s control of hardware and software means it can narrow the gap somewhat by optimizing like crazy, but there’s been a year of tech improvements between last year’s iPhone and this year’s Note.
For now the Note is arguably the better phone, but that’s likely to change in September when Apple is expected to unveil its 2015/2016 models. The Note may have caught up and perhaps zoomed past Apple, but Apple isn’t going to take that lying down.
What do you think? If money were no object, which one would you go for?

Friday, 7 August 2015

iPhone 6 vs Galaxy S6 comparison which is best phone.

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iPhone vs Galaxy S. Galaxy S vs iPhone. It’s a battle that has been raging since 2010, though it really only started to heat up with the release of the Galaxy S3 in 2012. These two lines of phones have often represented the peak of the smartphone industry, not because they are always the “best” phone available, but because of their popularity among consumers. This hasn’t changed in recent history, as both the iPhone 6 and the Galaxy S6 have shattered sales records. With each phone being as popular as they are, which should you buy?
In this article, I’m going to compare these two phones in a number of ways, and in the process you will hopefully get a better idea of which phone will suit you better. Let’s jump right in.

Design

6S6versus1
Both the iPhone 6 and Galaxy S6 are beautiful devices. Indeed, they both seem to draw on similar design motifs (I doubt that was an accident on Samsung’s part). The main difference between each is that the S6 uses a glass back, not unlike the iPhone 4 or 4S, while the 6 is encased in aluminum. Your mileage may vary, but some might not like the smudges and potential for shattering associated with the S6’s glass backing.
All in all though, the 6 is far more of a departure from previous designs than the S6 is. Comparing it to the iPhone 5S, the 6 is nearly unrecognizable, whereas the S6 looks very much like previous iterations when looking at it head on. That’s not a bad thing though, as there was nothing inherently wrong with Samsung’s design. They just had to spruce it up a bit with higher quality materials, which they accomplished with the S6.
Each device has a prominent home button that comes equipped with an advanced fingerprint scanner (Samsung greatly improved upon the technology used in the S5’s home button). While many won’t like how much space they take up, there’s no denying how useful they are.
The Galaxy S6 also comes in another variant, dubbed the S6 “Edge.” The only difference is that he screen bends around the sides of the device’s chassis, giving it a sleeker and more unique look. There isn’t much practical use for it yet, but it sure does look amazing (though it will set you back another $100).
What’s funny about the designs of these phones is that both Apple and Samsung seem to have pulled a page out of each other’s books. Apple increased the screen size of their device, while Samsung improved upon build quality. Both were trying to address perceived deficiencies, and I think that they each accomplished what they set out to do in that department.

Size

6S6versus2
Both phones are fairly similar in size. The S6 is slightly larger, but it also comes with a bigger screen (5.1″ vs 4.7″ on the iPhone). The iPhone is a tiny bit thinner than the S6, not including the camera bulge on either one.
Either way, you shouldn’t have too much of a problem carrying either phone around in your pocket or purse. Additionally, the screens on each phone are large enough for pretty much anything you would want to do, including reading and watching videos.

Display

6S6versus3
The displays on each phone are magnificent, though the Galaxy S6 just might “edge” the iPhone out in this department. Not only is it slightly larger, but its resolution is much better. We’re talking 2560 x 1440 pixels for the S6’s screen versus a mere 1334 x 750 pixels for the iPhone 6. Having played around with both, there’s not really as much of a difference as the numbers would suggest. But there is a difference. The flip side to this is that having a lower resolution means the iPhone 6 won’t have to work as hard to power certain apps and games, which might mean greater battery life and overall longevity down the road.

Performance

6S6versus4
I won’t get too technical on you here, as numbers really don’t tell you much when it comes to smartphone performance. Here are the essentials: the S6 comes with an eight-core processor and 3GB of ram, while the iPhone 6 comes with a dual-core processor and 1GB of ram. The S6 wins handily in certain benchmarks like Geekbench 3, but falls short in tests that measure browser speed. When it comes to the actual fluidity of the device, and overall user experience, the iPhone wins out (though just barely).
Samsung’s TouchWiz software continues to hold back the S6, as despite its powerful hardware it suffers from the occasional stutter or freeze that you won’t find on an iPhone. They do deserve some credit though, as the S6 runs far smoother than previous Galaxy S phones.
That said, power users should probably opt for the Galaxy S6. If you are tech savvy, you’ll be able to find ways to get the most out of that device’s impressive technical capabilities. Though the iPhone might “feel” smoother, it’s still outclassed from a hardware perspective.
You’ll have to decide on your priorities yourself. Those who want a smooth, streamlined experience should probably pick the iPhone. Those who want more raw power and potential for customization should opt for the S6.

Battery Life and Overall Longevity

6S6versus5
Both of these phones are top-of-the-line right now, but in just a few months that will no longer be the case. Which of these can you rely upon to get you through the next few years?
They each come with non-removable batteries, meaning you need to take care of the one you have so that it lasts the entirety of the time you have the device. Often times, batteries begin to lose their charge over the course of a two year contract, and if they aren’t replaced, you’ll notice. Since the iPhone 6 and Galaxy S6 both have sealed batteries, you’re going to see degrading battery performance no matter which you choose.
Indeed, both the S6 and iPhone 6 have average to poor battery life as it is. The S6 actually has a smaller battery than its predecessor, and Apple opted to slim its device down rather than give it more juice to work with. No matter which you choose, you’ll be forced to charge once or maybe even twice a day, depending on use.
What about software updates? There’s no question that Apple is better about supporting their older devices. Any iPhone 6 user should expect to get iOS updates all the up until they hit iOS 11, at the very least. That’s about three years of support, which is better than what most Android phones offer.
But is that a good thing? Often times, iOS updates will hurt your older phone more than they help, leading to battery drain and performance slowdowns. So even if the Galaxy S6 isn’t supported by software updates for as long as the iPhone 6 is, it probably won’t matter since installing new software on old hardware has diminishing returns anyways.
Bottom line is that you can safely assume each of these devices will last you through your two year contract, and then some. Beyond that, it’s your choice if you want to upgrade (I doubt smartphones will be all that different in 2016, so it might just be better to save your money and wait a bit longer…)

Value

6S6versus6
The Galaxy S6 is unquestionably the better value right now. At $199 on contract, it’s the same price as the iPhone 6, while being around six months newer. Additionally, the entry level version of the S6 comes with 32GB of storage as opposed to 16GB on the iPhone, meaning you’re getting more for your dollar.
If you are fully invested into the iOS ecosystem, then the iPhone would likely be the better choice. For anyone not tied to a particular operating system though, the S6 will give you more for your money.

Final Thoughts

You really can’t go wrong with either of these phones. Both are beautifully crafted devices with enough computing power to get you through the next several years. In a way, Apple and Samsung drew upon each other’s strengths with these two phones. The iPhone 6’s enlarged screen size is clearly a nod to the success of the Galaxy S line, and the S6’s immaculate build quality is undoubtedly a nod to the success of iPhones.
This can only mean good things for you, the consumer. Indeed, the success of both of these phones has me excited for what will be released in the years to come. In just a few short months, we’ll see how Apple responds to the S6 when they release the iPhone 6S. (Are these names getting confusing or is it just me?)
To learn more about these phones from their manufacturers, and to purchase one if you so choose, check out these links:
Do you own an iPhone 6 or Galaxy S6? What are your thoughts on this subject? Share your comments below!

Thursday, 6 August 2015

Why do I still use Android?

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iPhone Vs Android

I can’t remember the last time I only carried one smartphone with me on a daily basis. My main handset has been an iPhone since the device first debuted in 2007, but even then I also had a Nokia or a BlackBerry phone with me at all times. As sleek and exciting as the iPhone was, there was just too much functionality it didn’t include, and I wanted it all.
Fast-forward to 2015, and I still almost always carry two phones with me. Right now my main phone is an iPhone 6, but there’s also typically an Android handset in my pocket waiting patiently to fill in the blanks.
The problem, however, is that I’m running out of blanks to fill.
In 2015, smartphones are more capable than they have ever been before. Whether you use an Android handset or an iPhone, the device in your hand is more powerful and more versatile than the average desktop computer was just a few short years ago. In fact, there are millions upon millions of smartphone users around the world who might never even touch a conventional computer in their lifetimes, but they’ll still have access to remarkable functionality and the wealth of information that is the Internet.
Smartphone platforms themselves are also constantly evolving as Apple and Google add new features each year. Android M is sleeker and more refined than any previous Android build. And on the other side of the fence, iOS 9 is set to launch this fall and bring with it a host of new functionality.
I have been running a beta version of iOS 9 on my iPhone 6 since it was first released. Well, I did uninstall iOS 9 almost immediately after installing the first beta, but I reloaded iOS 9 on my phone once beta 2 was released and I haven’t looked back. Apple’s iOS 9 software is packed with new features, and I am now truly running out of reasons to use an Android phone alongside my iPhone 6.
google-now
I used to carry an Android phone in part because of the deep integration with Google services. But now, Google is taking over my iPhone and I couldn’t be happier. I also used to prefer Google Now on Android instead of the limited version in the Google app for iOS, but now Siri’s proactive suggestions address much of that functionality.
In fact, Siri is now even smarter than Google Now in some ways. For example, I go to the same dog park several times a week, and I always leave around the same time. Now, when I get in my car around that time, my iPhone automatically tells me how long it will take to drive to the dog park, and it lets me know if there is any traffic along the way.
It’s scary, but brilliant.
Siri is actually something I stopped using almost entirely just after it was first released, but I have to say, Siri in iOS 9 is pulling me back in. The virtual assistant’s newfound ability to understand commands that are strung together based on context is beyond impressive, and I often have trouble stumping Siri these days.
In the beginning, it was a struggle to find commands Siri could handle. In iOS 9, it’s a struggle to find things Siri can’t do.
ios-9-3
There is still functionality present in Android does that is absent in iOS. A great deal of functionality, in fact. For instance, I recently wrote about an Android app that adds one simple feature I wish I could have on my iPhone, and that’s just one of hundreds of nifty apps with capabilities that are nowhere to be found on the iPhone.
While iOS unquestionably attracts the best and the brightest mobile developers in the world, Apple’s mobile platform does have many limitations compared to Android as far as which features third-party apps can access and utilize. This is a good thing in some ways — just look at the signal to noise ratio in the App Store compared to Google Play — but it also means the iPhone may never have some great features Android users get to enjoy.
But how important are those features?
To some users, the ability to replace your icons or even your entire home screen is great. Other users wouldn’t dream of living without complex automation solutions like Tasker. In fact, we’ve covered dozens of great apps that do things the iPhone can’t.
The issue, however, is that the list of truly important functionality present on Android devices and absent from the iPhone is shrinking, and it’s shrinking very quickly.
Compounding matters is the fact that iOS now locks users in more than ever before. From iMessage, Handoff and Find My Friends to iOS-only apps and now Apple Music (at least, until an Android version is released), leaving iOS means leaving all of that behind and being on the outside.
A friend of mine said it best last year:
I have just about every flagship Android phone that has been released in the past 18 months, and might I even have a few that haven’t been announced yet. Most of them are great phones, and they’re more than capable enough to do anything I need them to do. The problem, however, is that I don’t really need them to do much of anything these days, because my iPhone can do all that and more.